Introducing TheBurg

Harrisburg, PA

By Karen Hendricks

Central Pennsylvania is one of the most unique media markets in the country. That’s because unlike most markets geographically focused on one city, the Central PA media market combines four cities clustered together, along with additional medium-sized outlying towns. Often called “Hilly,” for its acroynm of HLLY, the area encompasses the capital city of Harrisburg, along with Lancaster, Lebanon and York.

Each city has its own unique personality, yet together the cities of HLLY form the heart of central PA–a region where urban landscapes give way to rolling farmland, where technology and tourism merge with manufacturing and agriculture to form the top industries.

My career, geographically speaking, has come full circle. I began my work in the HLLY market by living and working in Harrisburg in 1993; a recent move back to the Harrisburg area after 22 years in the York/Adams region feels like a homecoming of sorts.

So I consider it an exciting honor to begin writing for a Harrisburg-based publication that I’ve admired for its quality of writing and journalistic integrity for a long tme, TheBurg.

I hope you enjoy reading my first two pieces for TheBurg, with links below:

Born to Run: Fred Joslyn takes his love of running around the midstate, across the world (TheBurg, August 2017)

Hoppy Trail: Best of the West Shore featured in the Cumberland Valley Beer Trail (TheBurg, July 2017)

Al’s of Hampden in Enola

 

Susquehanna Valley Staycations

By Karen Hendricks

A “staycation” is defined as “a vacation spent at home or nearby,” according to Merriam-Webster. Here in the Susquehanna Valley of Central Pennsylvania, there are infinite possibilities for summer staycations, saving traveling time and shrinking vacation budgets, with the added benefit of seeing our hometowns in a new light. In fact, some of the state’s top tourism destinations are right under our noses. Continue reading

Coulda Woulda Shoulda: Baseball Stories You May Not Have Heard (Yet)

By Karen Hendricks

Just in time for summer, York County author Chris Williams has released a book of 12 little-known yarns about American’s favorite pasttime, baseball. I am so proud of Chris, a former radio colleague who is a fellow writer. Best practices call for us writers to write about what we know, and Chris certainly knows about baseball.

Could the 1966 Cubs be the best team to ever finish in last place? Would Greg Luzinski, Fernando Valenzuela, or Eric Gagne have had the careers they did, if they hadn’t been September call-ups? Should Dick Allen be finally elected to the Hall of Fame? Chris tackles these questions and more, including the unusual case of a rookie who hit .313 in his rookie season only to be sent back to the minors the following year.

The book is sprinkled with statistical analysis, along with human interest stories, and nostalgic memories. Chris recounts a childhood trip to one of baseball’s historic ballparks with his own father, and he transcribes an invaluable recording made by his great-grandfather Jacob “Jake” Jeremiah who played professional baseball in the early 1900s. Baseball simply must be in Chris Williams’ blood.

Congrats, Chris, on the fantastic book, perfect for summertime reading by fans of all ages.

Click here for more information and ordering! 

Savor Gettysburg Food Tours: As Authentic as it Gets

Straight from the vine…

One of the biggest buzz words right now is “authentic.”

According to Merriam-Webster, “authentic” is defined as “real or genuine; not copied or false; true and accurate.”

Chances are, whatever your field of work, the concept of authenticity has touched or reshaped your work because it’s being driven by consumer demand. (To delve deeper, check out communications agency Cohn & Wolfe’s recent study examining the relationships between consumers and authentic brands.)

I think one of the most significant markets where authenticity counts is the food industry. Studies show that more consumers care about where and how their foods are grown and made, whether they are organic, pasture-raised, cage-free, and local. (Click here for a recent Forbes’ article detailing 2017 food trends, with “Sustainability” as #5.)

So, being a foodie myself, and spending a good deal of time writing about food, I want to shine a spotlight on a friend who is doing an amazing job creating fun, authentic food tours and experiences. Continue reading

Carlisle: All-American Spirit and History

Colonial-style China, featured at 1794 The Whiskey Rebellion, Carlisle

Colonial-style China, featured at 1794 The Whiskey Rebellion, Carlisle

By Karen Hendricks

As we celebrate Presidents Day, here’s a piece of Pennsylvania-themed presidential trivia:

Only one president has ever acted as commander-in-chief of troops in the field. Which president? What was the situation?

Answer: President George Washington acted as commander-in-chief of troops while staying in Carlisle, Pennsylvania for a week in 1794 when he organized federal suppression of the Whiskey Rebellion in western Pennsylvania. That’s because Carlisle was Washington’s choice for the location of our first arsenal and school for the U.S. Army.

These fascinating facts relate to two stories I recently covered for two regional magazines. Both stories are based in Carlisle, a quaint, charming historical town that also features a fun, hip vibe.  In 2015, Carlisle was named one of America’s Top 100 Best Small Towns in 2015 by Livability.com (Carlisle came in at #16). Continue reading

Show Your LinkedIn Photo a Little Love

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By Karen Hendricks

Branding has become personal. According to a recent article in Forbes, “The term branding has long been relegated to companies, but today almost every individual has a personal brand… a digital footprint in the sands of time and space, crowd sourced by friends, colleagues, and bosses.”

Perhaps the most important personal branding takes place on LinkedIn, social media for professionals, with our profile pictures playing a starring role.

linkedin_logo_initialsLet’s face the facts, pun intended, and review 10 simple guidelines to be sure your LinkedIn image is picture-perfect: Continue reading

Why do people choose the media as a profession?

A look at current American culture, the relationship between the media, the public, and ‘master manipulators’ in our new administration

By Karen Hendricks

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So, why do people choose the media as a profession?

It’s a passion for writing and communicating, a love of words whether written or spoken, the thrill of discovering a great story, a sense of honor while being entrusted to tell those stories, shining a light on injustices or wrongs, a way to connect people with vital or interesting information, providing a platform for voices that might otherwise go unheard, and much more. A lot of us are “word nerds.” Simply put, we have the gift of communicating. Explaining, assessing situations, hearing both sides (or more) of a story, and presenting the facts as we’ve gathered them to inform the public; along with quotes/soundbites of those involved to add detail, emotion, and credibility.

For the vast majority of us, it’s certainly not for the money.

And it’s certainly not to be bashed by the American public; ridiculed or threatened by government officials. Yes, we the media should be held to high standards, but not viciously attacked.

Thankfully the U.S. Constitution guarantees us, the American public, the right to free speech as well as the right to a free press (media). Continue reading